Bevilling fra ITN European Industrial Doctorate Programme – Københavns Universitet

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05. januar 2017

Bevilling fra ITN European Industrial Doctorate Programme

Bevilling

Lektor Kasper D. Rand på Institut for Farmaci har modtaget 4,3 mio. fra "The Doctoral Industrial School for Vaccine Design through Structural Mass Spectrometry".

Lektor Kasper D. Rand, Section of Analytical Biosciences på Institut for Farmaci, og Natalie Norais, GlaxoSmithKline, har modtaget bevilling fra VADEMA (Doctoral Industrial School for Vaccine Design through Structural Mass Spectrometry).
Institut for Farmacis andel udgør 4,3 mio. kroner.

Projektinformation

Vaccines consisting of live-attenuated microorganisms or purified protein components (antigens) have led to the successful control of many devastating diseases. However, despite decades of research, vaccines still do not exist for several of the most life-threatening infections.

An effective immune response requires the exposure of key parts of the protein antigen (the epitope) to the binding of antibodies. Thus careful analysis of the structure of vaccine antigens combined with knowledge of where antibodies bind the protein antigen to cause protection has emerged as a powerful new strategy for the rational vaccine design. 

In this research programme, we will develop and apply new and advanced analytical methodology that uses mass spectrometry to measure the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins in solution (HDX-MS) to better understand the dynamic structure and antibody interactions of a range of promising vaccine antigens. From this work, we hope to provide a unique framework for improving and guiding the design of new protein-based vaccines.

Læs mere om bevillingen på VADEMAs website.

Se jobopslag vedr. de fire ph.d.-stillinger, som er en del af bevillingen:
Call for 4 Early Stage Researcher Fellowships in "Doctoral Industrial School for Vaccine Design through Structural Mass Spectrometry"